Archive for September, 2014

The Sticklers reunite

By
September 19th, 2014



Live fast, die young. Just do it. Party like a rock star. Turn up.

The rock ’n’ roll lifestyle can be very unforgiving. Save for a few legendary bands, most musicians hit that bump in the road that leads them off the path of success and into the realm of starring in their own episode of “E! True Hollywood Story” or VH1’s “Behind the Music.”

20010331 FTR STICKLERS 4

THE STICKLERS

With openers Beaman and TV Microwave

» Where: Downbeat Lounge, 42 N. Hotel St.

» When: 9 p.m. Friday

» Cost: $5 suggested donation; proceeds go to the Hawaii Bone Marrow Donor Registry

» Info: (808) 533-2328, downbeatdiner.com

So when word came of a reunion show by local punk rockers The Sticklers, this reporter started to wonder what happened to the band that once opened for The Vandals, The Strokes and Dancehall Crashers. It had been at least a decade since I heard anything about what they were up to.

Thankfully, the band’s three remaining members — Dave “Dave Noodle” Hewlett, Scott “Otto” McDonough and Alex Wakata — are all doing just fine in 2014. Otto and Alex continue to play music, although Otto is more commonly recognized these days for the wickedly delicious cheesecake sold at his Kaimuki bakery.

Hewlett, on the other hand, is now a family man with a 9-to-5 job like so many others here in Hawaii. That hasn’t stopped him from wanting to get back on stage, however. Nearly 10 years after their last reunion show, the time has finally come to get the band back together once again.

“People have been asking us for years” about another reunion show, he said. After officially splitting up in 2002, The Sticklers played a handful of gigs over the next few years before a final show in 2005.

“I would run into people from the scene and they’d ask about it. That’s the thing, Hawaii bands never break up. They just kind of go into hiding.”

About a year ago, Hewlett starting talking with Downbeat Diner co-owner Josh Hancock about getting him, Alex and Otto back on stage together. Nothing happened at the time, but the two crossed paths again in February when another band, Buckshot Shorty, hosted a reunion show of their own.

“It looked like a lot of fun,” Hewlett said. “I wanted to be able to play again and see if people still remember (our music). But I wanted it to be that we’re doing something for someone else. … We never did music to make money.”

In true DIY fashion, the band has taken it upon themselves to help raise funds for the Hawaii Bone Marrow Donor Registry. All proceeds from the door will be donated to the organization; a $5 minimum donation is suggested.

STAR-ADVERTISER / 2002The Sticklers on stage at the old Pink Cadillac in Waikiki.

STAR-ADVERTISER / 2002

The Sticklers on stage at the old Pink Cadillac in Waikiki.

Looking back at the band’s heyday in the late 1990s and early 2000s, Hewlett said he thinks the local rock scene remains vibrant — with one key difference.

“The scene has always had it’s highs and lows,” he said. “From what i understand right now, it seems to be pretty healthy. But we need all-ages options. That was the thing we really liked; we always tried to play all-ages shows.

“The kids are the heart and soul of punk rock. You’re learning about yourself at that age. I just think we need more all-ages venues.”

Another change? Concert promoting. Hewlett took the lead in promoting Friday’s show, just as he did back in the day.

“Otto said it was cool, he kind of let me just run with it,” he said. “It’s been fun. I used to set up shows all the time when i was in the band.

“But now there’s social media. We didn’t have instagram and Facebook back then. The only reason the band is on Instagram was because my daughter got me on it.”

Come Friday night, however, The Sticklers hope to reconnect with familiar faces and share the music that dominated their lives nearly 20 years ago. The pressure to perform has even motivated them to sit down together and actually practice — something that didn’t happen very often the first time around.

“We’ve practiced a couple times, but it’ll be sloppy and fun, which won’t be any different than what we did before,” said Hewlett.

“We’ll play maybe 45 minutes,” he added with a laugh. “I don’t know if I can handle any longer than that!”

———

Jason Genegabus is Entertainment Editor/Online at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser and has covered the local nightlife, music, bar and entertainment scenes since 2001. Contact him via email at jason@staradvertiser.com and follow him on Twitter and Google+.

Posted in Music | Comments Off on The Sticklers reunite

Hayakawa cancels Halloween bash

By
September 11th, 2014



One of Honolulu’s most popular Halloween costume parties won’t take place this year, a main organizer of the event said last week.

JASON GENEGABUS / 2010The Diamondhead HUI's annual Halloween costume party will take a break this year and return in 2015.

JASON GENEGABUS / 2010

The Diamondhead HUI's annual Halloween costume party will take a break this year and return in 2015.

Crazy, Sexy, GHOUL drew nearly 4,000 people in 2013, according to Diamondhead HUI co-founder David Hayakawa. He is one of the driving forces behind the organization and has helped throw a number of different parties over the years.

“I loved every GHOUL that we have had, but sometimes bigger isn’t better,” Hayakawa wrote in a letter that made the rounds via social media. “For those of you who were at the original parties ‘On the Slopes of Diamond Head,’ then at Bedroq’s Halloween and Screaming Tiki Beach Party, to the terrific Mardi Gras parties at the W and the first GHOUL at the Plaza Club, those parties never had more than 800 guests and everyone had a great time. The two GHOUL parties at Aloha Tower never had more than 1,500 guests. It was only the past two years that we had more than 3,000 guests.

“I am confident that 1,500 is a perfect number of people to keep things fresh and exciting, but not so crowded that people we don’t know are in attendance. … My party instincts tell me that a classy 2015 GHOUL, filled with an exclusive group of friends who share my vision of good people having a great time while partying for a cause will allow us to successfully continue ‘Crazy, Sexy, GHOUL’ into the future.”

The decision makes sense for a guy who continues to work full-time as a lawyer and underwrites the expenses for all of his parties so that all money from ticket sales can be donated to charity. But why not simply scale back a bit instead of canceling for the year?

“The party was just too big for an old guy like me,” admitted Hayakawa. “We considered reducing the size of the party this year, but telling 2,500 people that they can’t get tickets seemed like a recipe for disaster, so we decided to shut down for the year.

“A 1,500-guest exclusive party with everyone giving $20 to Make-a-Wish will raise $30,000 and we’ll still have a blast.”

It will also give friends of the Diamondhead HUI an extra 12 months to come up with an even crazier and sexier costume for 2015!

———

Jason Genegabus is Entertainment Editor/Online at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser and has covered the local nightlife, music, bar and entertainment scenes since 2001. Contact him via email at jason@staradvertiser.com and follow him on Twitter and Google+.

RELATED POSTS:

» PICS: Crazy, Sexy, GHOUL at Aloha Tower

» PICS: Crazy, Sexy, GHOUL at The Waterfront

Posted in Halloween | Comments Off on Hayakawa cancels Halloween bash

Alcon helps 'Revive' music scene

By
September 5th, 2014



Hawaii’s Finest Clothing has come far since its humble beginnings on Molokai. For Paulele Alcon, printing up a few T-shirts and selling them out of his car has turned into retail locations on two islands (with more on the way), deals to distribute his designs in other stores on Oahu and a fledgling second career as a concert promoter and music industry executive.

Maori group Katchafire will headline the Revive the Live Music Festival on Saturday at the Waikiki Shell. (Courtesy Katchafire!)

REVIVE THE LIVE MUSIC FESTIVAL 2014

Featuring Katchafire (pictured), Fiji, Kolohe Kai, Maoli, Ekolu and Ooklah the Moc

» Where: Waikiki Shell, 2805 Monsarrat Ave.

» When: 4:30 p.m. Saturday (doors open at 4 p.m.)

» Cost: $30-$90

» Info: (800) 745-3000, ticketmaster.com, hifinest.com

“Everything is cherry,” Alcon said by phone earlier this week as he prepped for Saturday’s first annual Revive the Live Music Festival at the Waikiki Shell. “I’ve been pretty much hanging out with Katchafire the last two days. … I’m pretty much promoting.”

That’s not to say his clothing line is slipping. With a talented team in place, HI Finest continues to thrive with ongoing releases, including a new fall line scheduled to drop on Friday. Alcon understands that in order to keep his new projects in motion, he must continue to excel with the business that brought him initial success.

“The staff is solid at Hawaii’s Finest,” he said. “The clothing has been solid. We print more every line and the other stores order more every line.”

Since its launch in 2009, Hawaii’s Finest has opened stores on Molokai (2010) and Oahu (2013) with plans to expand to Kapolei on Oahu as well as Maui and Hawaii island. The growth in popularity of the brand, coupled with Alcon’s willingness to get out and network within the Honolulu nightlife and music scenes, resulted in new opportunities almost immediately.

“When I moved to Oahu from Molokai, I partied a lot,” said Alcon, 29. “I would always go to The Shack Waikiki and party with Micah G. Next thing you know, I was there every week. And then I started promoting my own shows.”

STAR-ADVERTISER / 2013Hawaii's Finest owner Paulele Alcon, center, at The Republik during a Revive the Live party in 2013.

STAR-ADVERTISER / 2013

Hawaii's Finest owner Paulele Alcon, center, at The Republik during a Revive the Live party in 2013.

PICKING UP the promoter role wasn’t difficult, since Hawaii’s Finest had already “pretty much sponsored every band out of Hawaii” by providing free T-shirts for them to wear on stage. When it came time to booking those bands himself, Alcon had no problem capitalizing on the relationships he had previously established.

Changing musical tastes among the clubbing crowd soon presented a different challenge, however.

“The whole thing was, we started at The Shack when local music was really strong. Every weekend was raging. Then we hit a point where the rave scene kind of took over and all the local music promoters kind of gave up,” Alcon said. “For a year straight, our shows would barely break even.

“So I got this idea for the Revive the Live Concert Series campaign to bring the music back. I got Heineken on board, Island 98.5 on board and The Republik, I knew it would pick up and we’d have a really strong weekly party.”

Alcon was right; Revive the Live quickly became the go-to spot for live local music on Friday nights, taking advantage of The Republik’s spaciousness and quality sound system to attract approximately 1,000 party people to Kapiolani Blvd. each week. Soon the discussion turned to producing even bigger events based off the Revive the Live concept, and Alcon found himself in discussions to produce a concert at the Shell.

“My first concert I ever went to was at the Shell, he said. “It’s always been a dream of mine since I’ve started doing shows. Bob Marley played there. Elvis played there.

“I’ve done (concerts at) Kakaako (Waterfront Park) before, but not the Shell. Everything is falling into place. … Once things started moving along, I realized it’s not that hard. So now I have two more shows lined up there.”

STAR-ADVERTISER / 2013Models show off Hawaii's Finest products during a Revive the Live party at The Republik.

STAR-ADVERTISER / 2013

Models show off Hawaii's Finest products during a Revive the Live party at The Republik.

FOLLOWING THE inaugural Revive the Live Music Festival, Alcon said he plans to celebrate Hawaii’s Finest’s five-year anniversary in December with a Winter Bash, followed by a traditional Hawaiian concert in the spring. He stressed that HI Finest isn’t just about reggae and island contemporary artists, noting previous efforts to land Journey and casual discussions he’s had with Robert Cazimero when the two crossed paths at their local Starbucks.

“I run into (Cazimero) at Starbucks three or four times a week, so I asked him what he thought if I started promoting traditional Hawaiian concerts and he was supportive,” Alcon said. “I don’t know much about music, but I feel like I don’t want to waste the resources I have. I’m busy, but I still want to take advantage of the opportunities.”

Along with fashion and music, Hawaii’s Finest also has plans in motion to make the jump into television. Alcon said he’s working on a “new, hip version of the ‘Hawaiian Moving Company’” that will feature rotating celebrity guest hosts and focus on Hawaii’s music, nightclub, automotive and mixed martial arts scenes.

But first, he’s got to get through this weekend. On top of the festival, Alcon plans to get a music video shot on Sunday (win access at Saturday’s show) and will also host an official Revive the Live Music Festival afterparty at The Republik with two of the bands from the festival’s lineup.

“I’m not too nervous,” said Alcon. “Ticket sales are decent. They’re so cheap, I know a lot of people are gonna pick them up last minute. It’s like this with every show.”

———

Jason Genegabus is Entertainment Editor/Online at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser and has covered the local nightlife, music, bar and entertainment scenes since 2001. Contact him via email at jason@staradvertiser.com and follow him on Twitter and Google+.

RELATED POST:

Katchafire returns for Revive the Live Music Fest

Posted in Latest News, SA | Comments Off on Alcon helps 'Revive' music scene

Recent Posts

Recent Comments

Archives

Categories