Archive for April, 2016

Taking hip-hop to the classroom

By
April 29th, 2016



COURTESY TODAY'S FUTURE SOUNDDr. Raphael Travis talks about hip-hop and beat making with students at the University of Hawaii at Manoa on Thursday.

COURTESY TODAY'S FUTURE SOUND

Dr. Raphael Travis talks about hip-hop and beat making with students at the University of Hawaii at Manoa on Thursday.

Hip-hop music is so mainstream these days, most fans expect to hear or see elements of the culture intertwined with many forms of popular media. But did you know educators have started to incorporate the genre into their lesson plans and training materials?

University of Hawaii instructor and PhD candidate Kimberly Corbin is teaming up with Oakland-based hip-hop ambassador/producer Dr. Elliot Gann and Texas State University professor Dr. Raphael Travis to bring hip-hop to a pair of Honolulu high schools this week, followed by a beat battle fundraiser on Saturday at Kaka’ako Agora that’s open to the public.

“We always read so many negative things (in media), and as an educator I would really like the community to see that many of us are working hard to find ways to reach all children and to train our teacher candidates to do the same,” Corbin said via email. “The work we will do ... this week is important for the kids and for the faculty.”

Corbin, Gann and Travis took part in the 2016 Pacific Rim International Conference on Disability and Diversity at the Hawai’i Convention Center on Monday and Tuesday. On Wednesday, they visited three classes at Farrington High School; Kailua High School students got a visit yesterday morning, followed by a workshop in the afternoon at UH-Manoa.

According to Corbin, students can benefit from multimedia presentations that combine “theory, rationale and practical strategies to explore the use of hip-hop culture as an instructional tool to support student engagement and achievement.” Hip-hop culture helps foster positive growth in families and communities, she said.

Saturday’s Sound Wave Beat Battle Fundraiser aims to connect the classroom experience students received this week with a public event that promotes the same concepts and helps raise money to support future educational efforts. The all-ages event takes place from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at Kaka’ako Agora and is produced by Today’s Future Sound.

Admission to Sound Wave is $5 for those under 18 and $10 for those 18-and-over. If you’re 18+ and bring a can of food to donate, you’ll pay $7 at the door. Email info@todaysfuturesound.org or visit facebook.com/todaysfuturesound for more information.
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Jason Genegabus has covered the local entertainment, nightlife, music and bar scenes since 2001. Contact him via email at jason@staradvertiser.com.

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Waikiki offers multiple May Day entertainment options

By
April 27th, 2016



BRUCE ASATO / 2015Danny Kaleikini performs during the 2015 May Day Waikiki concert. The event returns to the beach fronting the Royal Hawaiian and Outrigger Waikiki on Sunday.

BRUCE ASATO / 2015

Danny Kaleikini performs during the 2015 May Day Waikiki concert. The event returns to the beach fronting the Royal Hawaiian and Outrigger Waikiki on Sunday.

As the old saying goes, May Day is Lei Day in Hawaii — and you really can make a day of it in Waikiki on Sunday.

Get started with the 89th annual Lei Day celebration at Kapiolani Park at 9 a.m. The free, all-day event kicks off with performances by the Royal Hawaiian Band and Nā Wahine O Ka Hula Mai Ka Pu‘uwai, followed by an investiture ceremony for the 2016 Lei Queen and afternoon performances by Chad Takatsugi, Bobby Moderow Jr., Melveen Leed and Amy Hanaiali’i.

Sponsored by the City and County of Honolulu, the celebration also includes a display of lei contest entries, Hawaiian craft exhibits and food booths. 2016 Lei Queen Carol Ana Makana Lani Yamada, 2007 Lei Queen Manu Anana and 2010 Lei Queen Jamie Kaohulani Adams Detwiler will be in attendance as well. Call (808) 768-3041 or visit honoluluparks.com.

From 2 to 4:30 p.m. Sunday, the Hawaii Tourism Authority presents the third annual May Day Waikiki concert with headliners Melveen Leed, Henry Kapono and Brother Noland.

Held on the sand fronting the Royal Hawaiian Hotel and the Outrigger Waikiki on the Beach, this year’s event also honors the history and tradition of the Waikiki Beach Boys. Those set to be recognized on Sunday include:

» Albert “Rabbit” Kekai
» George Downing
» Harry Robello
» James “Lord TallyHo” Blears
» Edward “Blackout” Whaley
» Richard “Buffalo” Keaulana

Admission to Sunday’s concert is free; follow @maydaywaikiki on Instagram for more details.

Wrap up May Day with even more music at the Outrigger Reef Waikiki Beach Resort as Kani Ka Pila Grille kicks off its Mele Mei Sunday Concert Series. Two different artists will be featured every Sunday through May 29 from 5 to 9 p.m.

Part of the month-long Mele Mei celebration of Hawaiian music, the series opens with Blayne Asing and Brother Noland this weekend, followed by Ben Vegas and Maila Gibson with Nathan Aweau on May 8.

Upcoming featured artists include Kuuipo Kumukahi with Mailani Makainai (May 15), Lehua Kalima and Shawn Pimental with Kuana Torres Kahele (May 22) and Kupaoa with Maunalua (May 29). Call (808) 924-4990 for reservations.
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Jason Genegabus has covered the local entertainment, nightlife, music and bar scenes since 2001. Contact him via email at jason@staradvertiser.com.

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Time running out for Kapalua Wine and Food Fest discounts

By
April 26th, 2016



STAR-ADVERTISER / 2012The 35th annual Kapalua Wine and Food Festival returns to Maui in June.

STAR-ADVERTISER / 2012

The 35th annual Kapalua Wine and Food Festival returns to Maui in June.

Only a few days remain to take advantage of early bird ticket specials for the longest-running food and wine event in the United States.

The 35th annual Kapalua Wine and Food Festival is set for June 9 through June 12 on Maui, with a variety of educational and tasting events scheduled at the Ritz-Carlton Kapalua and Montage Kapalua Bay.

Special guests this year include restauranteur and “Top Chef” judge Hugh Acheson and chef Michele Mazza of New York’s Il Mulino, who will both lead celebrity chef cooking demonstrations during the festival. Annual gala events include the Grand Tasting, featuring food from Kapalua-area restaurants and premium wines, and the Seafood Festival, which features 14 of Maui’s top restaurants and more wine to go with live music by Maui’s Nuff Sedd.

A number of wine seminars are also scheduled, including a “Champagne and Scooby Snack” tasting hosted by master sommelier Rob Bigelow, and “Family Tree - Scions of Family Wineries” with special guest panelists Carlo Mondavi (RAEN Vineyards/Continuum), Christopher Hyde (Hyde and Sons) and Brandon De Luze (ZD) among others. Master sommelier Michael Jordan will also present “Ten Year Magic Retrospective,” a look at what a decade of aging can do to bottles of cabernet sauvignon.

Now through April 30, four-day passes are available for $895, with gala event tickets discounted to $180 each. Special room, air and car packages are also available through the festival’s travel partners; visit kapaluawineandfoodfestival.com for more details.
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Jason Genegabus has covered the local entertainment, nightlife, music and bar scenes since 2001. Contact him via email at jason@staradvertiser.com.

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Hawaii breweries make 'Best Beers in America' list

By
April 26th, 2016



Two neighbor island breweries were honored by Men’s Journal earlier this month when the magazine published its list of the 101 Best Beers in America.

Big Island Brewhaus' Overboard India Pale Ale and Maui Brewing Company’s Coconut Porter were the beers that made the list.

COURTESY BIG ISLAND BREWHAUS

COURTESY BIG ISLAND BREWHAUS

According to the magazine, the Overboard IPA provides “just the right amount of bitterness” and a “pleasant, citrusy aroma” that reminded writers of Sierra Nevada’s Torpedo and Anchor Steam’s Liberty Ale.

COURTESY MAUI BREWING CO.

COURTESY MAUI BREWING CO.

Of Maui Brewing’s porter, Men’s Journal said while Hawaii’s climate doesn’t typically make people crave the richness that comes with this style of beer, MBC puts “an island spin” on their version that incorporates toasted coconut to compliment chocolate notes and a “silky” mouthfeel.

Both beers are widely available at retail and are also easily found at Honolulu bars and restaurants.
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Jason Genegabus has covered the local entertainment, nightlife, music and bar scenes since 2001. Contact him via email at jason@staradvertiser.com.

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Pagoda concert to benefit Fiji cyclone victims

By
April 20th, 2016



ASSOCIATED PRESSA man makes repairs to his home in RakiRaki, Fiji, on Feb. 24 after cyclone Winston ripped through the island nation.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A man makes repairs to his home in RakiRaki, Fiji, on Feb. 24 after cyclone Winston ripped through the island nation.

Fiji residents were still dealing with the fallout from Cyclone Winston, which hit the tiny island nation in February as the most powerful storm in the Southern Hemisphere on record and killed 44 people.

In a show of solidarity and support, the University of Hawaii’s Pacific Islanders in the Arts, Center for Pacific Islands Studies, UH-Manoa Political Science Department, East-West Center’s Pacific Islands Development Program, Pan-Pacific Association and Hawaii’s Fijian community will host a benefit concert at the Pagoda Hotel, 1525 Rycroft Street, on Saturday from 5 p.m. to midnight.

Entertainment will be hosted by DJ-Dan with support from Taupou Productions and Sound System; additional bands and entertainers are invited to participate by contacting Dan at (202) 734-9364. Tickets for the fundraiser are $20 general admission, $10 for students with valid ID. Call (808) 230-9843, (808) 469-5129 or (808) 491-8224 for more information.

In addition, a bank account has been opened at Bank of Hawaii to collect donations. Mention “Aloha Appeal for Fiji” when making a donation at any BOH branch and the money will be sent to the Fiji Red Cross Society to aid in relief efforts.
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Jason Genegabus has covered the local entertainment, nightlife, music and bar scenes since 2001. Contact him via email at jason@staradvertiser.com.

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Ketel One searches for 'Master' Moscow Mule-makers in Waikiki

By
April 20th, 2016



You don’t have to be a bartender to enter Ketel One’s Master of the Mule competition in Honolulu next week. But you do need to enter by the deadline — which is Thursday — for a shot at being invited to the finals at Sky Waikiki, 2270 Kalakaua Avenue, on Monday.

Vodka brand Ketel One is hosting the event to help pick an official recipe for the Dutch Mule, their version of the Moscow Mule cocktail. Traditionally made with vodka, ginger beer and lime juice and garnished with a lime wedge in a copper mug, the drink has exploded in popularity over the last few years.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ketel decided to conduct their search in honor of the company’s 365th anniversary and 11 generations of family ownership. Before liquor conglomerate Diageo invested $900 million into Nolet Distillers nearly a decade ago in a joint partnership agreement, the Nolet family had kept things running smoothly in the Netherlands for hundreds of years.

Both amateur and professional mixologists are invited to present their version of the traditional Moscow Mule with a creative twist for a shot at the $1,000 cash prize for first place, $500 in cash and prizes for second and $250 in cash and prizes for third. Recipes must feature Ketel One, Ketel One Citroen or Ketel One Oranje as the main ingredient.

Submission deadline for entries is Thursday; submit an application and original recipe online at 6pillarsmarketing.com/ketelone. Approximately six to eight finalists will be chosen from submissions received by the deadline to participate in Monday’s final round of competition.
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Jason Genegabus has covered the local entertainment, nightlife, music and bar scenes since 2001. Contact him via email at jason@staradvertiser.com.

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Making a Blue Hawaii the right way is easier than you think

By
April 15th, 2016



The world changed for the better nearly 60 years ago when Harry Yee created the Blue Hawaii cocktail.

Yee, 98, was the head bartender at the Hilton Hawaiian Village when it was still owned by Henry J. Kaiser and was responsible for coming up with most, if not all, of the tropical drinks served in funky cups that you see on the hotel’s bar menus from the 1950’s and 1960’s. His drinks have put smiles on millions upon millions of visitors to Waikiki, and his legacy lives on via bartenders working in establishments both in Hawaii and around the world.

7DENNIS ODA / DODA@STARADVERTISER.COMHarry Yee with his creation, the Blue Hawaii cocktail, at the Hilton Hawaiian Village in March.

DENNIS ODA / DODA@STARADVERTISER.COM

Harry Yee with his creation, the Blue Hawaii cocktail, at the Hilton Hawaiian Village in March.

As the decades have passed, however, Yee has seen his famous drink bastardized by ego-driven bartenders who substitute ingredients — or even worse, add and/or remove them altogether — and corporate bean-counters who ensure customers won’t enjoy their drinks by requiring them to be made with cheap, low-quality ingredients.

“Other places, they copy and change it,” Yee acknowledged in March during an interview for my “Barfly” column in this week’s edition of TGIF. “They copy, but it’s not the real recipe. … Today, people talk about dark and light rum not realizing that rum from Puerto Rico and rum from Jamaica, the taste is, you know, opposite.”

Yee’s original Blue Hawaii recipe calls for 3/4 ounce of vodka, 3/4 ounce light Puerto Rican rum, 1/2 ounce Bols blue curacao, an ounce of sweet and sour and three ounces of fresh pineapple juice. The ingredients are poured over ice and stirred in a clear hurricane glass — and as legend has it, Yee would hold up each drink he made to make sure the color looked just like the Pacific Ocean just outside the hotel.

7DENNIS ODA / DODA@STARADVERTISER.COMHarry Yee, fifth from right, was on hand for the unveiling of the Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Beach Resort in March. A photo of him holding a Blue Hawaii is part of the exhibit..

DENNIS ODA / DODA@STARADVERTISER.COM

Harry Yee, fifth from right, was on hand for the unveiling of the Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Beach Resort in March. A photo of him holding a Blue Hawaii is part of the exhibit.

Sadly, the Hilton Hawaiian Village itself doesn’t currently make its Blue Hawaii according to Yee’s 1957 specifications. A recent visit to the bar at Tropics in the hotel uncovered a bit of a bait-and-switch, with the bar’s version missing the rum you’d expect to find in the drink. But if you’re familiar with the recipe, you’d notice one that’s almost accurate listed under a drink called the Blue Ocean, although it uses Jamaican rum instead of the Puerto Rican rum Yee’s recipe calls for.

My suggestion? Head further into Waikiki and check out Bills Sydney at the corner of Kalakaua and Beach Walk. They serve up a tasty Blue Hawaii made with Flor de Cana rum from Nicaragua and Tito’s vodka for just $6 from 3 to 6 p.m. While they tweak the recipe further by substituting pure lemon juice for sweet and sour mix, Bills makes up for it nicely by including a paper umbrella in the drink, which Yee said was originally his idea back in the day (he said adding an orchid to a cocktail as garnish was his idea, too).

PHOTOS BY JASON GENEGABUS / JASON@STARADVERTISER.COMThe Blue Hawaii from Bills Waikiki is just $6 during happy hour.

JASON GENEGABUS / JASON@STARADVERTISER.COM

The Blue Hawaii from Bills Waikiki is just $6 during happy hour.

And unlike a lot of modern cocktails that require a ton of ingredients you either don’t have easy access to, or can’t justify purchasing an entire bottle of just to make a couple of drinks, the Blue Hawaii uses the same liquor as many other popular recipes, so you probably have most of them stocked in your bar already. The only sacrifice you’ll have to make is buying a full bottle of Bols blue curacao, but its bitter orange flavor is actually well-suited for mixing cocktails once you get over the bright blue color of the liqueur. And no matter what, Yee said, be sure to buy Bols for best results.

IF YOU'RE mixing drinks at home, the Blue Hawaii is insanely easy to create. Start with a hurricane glass — an oversized pint glass or tall pilsner beer glass can also work in a pinch — and fill with ice. Add pineapple juice and sweet and sour, then finish by pouring in the liquor and stirring to bring all the ingredients together.

This technique of building the drink in a serving glass was designed for speed in the high-volume bars Yee was accustomed to working in. But it’s also practical in the way the drink continues to evolve as a customer stirs it and allows the ice to melt and alter its flavor profile. The ratio of liquor to mixers in this drink, when made properly, lets the sweetness of the pineapple juice take center stage and masks any of the alcohol burn one might expect.

But like Yee said, these days a lot of bartenders change recipes without giving too much thought as to what the drink’s original creator had envisioned. It’s second nature now for cocktails to be created in shakers filled with ice, then strained into another glass that may or may not have fresh ice inside of it.

Using this method to make a Blue Hawaii, while creating a visually pleasing foam at the top of the glass, brings the alcohol to the forefront and all but eliminates the sweetness from the pineapple juice. Those who need to feel the bite of alcohol to know their drink is working may prefer a shaken Blue Hawaii, but the flavors are much more well-balanced when stirred instead.

Even more confusing is the bartender who makes a Blue Hawaii using a blender. A different cocktail that Yee didn’t invent is known as the Blue Hawaiian and calls for many of the same ingredients as a Blue Hawaii, but with some sort of cream or coconut liqueur thrown in as well.

The reason for the extra ingredients? Adding more ice to a drink without increasing the amount of alcohol obviously dilutes it, and the only way to overcome the problem is to add more liquor and/or milk fat to improve the mouthfeel.

PHOTOS BY JASON GENEGABUS / JASON@STARADVERTISER.COMOn the left, a Blue Hawaii that's stirred, not shaken. On the right is a blended Blue Hawaii.

PHOTOS BY JASON GENEGABUS / JASON@STARADVERTISER.COM

On the left, a Blue Hawaii that's stirred, not shaken. On the right is a blended Blue Hawaii.

I RECENTLY spent an afternoon with local mixology expert Joey Gottesman tasting different ways of preparing the drink, and the only other suggestion I can make, other than insisting your bartender stir it and not shake or blend it, is to supercharge your Blue Hawaii with the most premium liquor you can afford.

Gottesman pulled out a bottle of Rhum Clement, a mighty tasty agricole rum, and some Russian Standard vodka to go with fresh-squeezed pineapple juice and housemade sweet and sour mix when I asked for his interpretation of a top shelf Blue Hawaii. After adding a twist of lime for an additional hit of citrus, this version might have looked a little more green than blue in the glass, but using Rhum Clement elevated it from something kitschy to drink by the pool into a cocktail I wouldn’t be ashamed to order with friends while out for a meal.

People who talk trash about the Blue Hawaii have probably always had them made with cheap well liquor, canned pineapple juice and a bunch of high fructose corn syrup mixed with artificial flavors. But if you combine Yee’s classic recipe with today’s focus on fresh ingredients and a bar that produces its own mixers, the cocktail blossoms into a beautiful alcoholic postcard from paradise.
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Jason Genegabus has covered the local entertainment, nightlife, music and bar scenes since 2001. Contact him via email at jason@staradvertiser.com.

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Regal Kapolei Commons previews new concession items

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April 13th, 2016



PHOTOS BY DENNIS ODA / DODA@STARADVERTISER.COM University of Hawaii West Oahu Academy for Creative Media students and staff, from left, Sharla Hanaoka, Kevin Bechayda, Julian Silveria, August Harrington, Melissa Lum, Mahealani Kahala and Melissa Garabiles pose for a photo with items from the Kapolei Commons 12 concession before heading into the showcase Hale Ikua theater to screen a short film they produced.

PHOTOS BY DENNIS ODA / DODA@STARADVERTISER.COM

University of Hawaii West Oahu Academy for Creative Media students and staff, from left, Sharla Hanaoka, Kevin Bechayda, Julian Silveria, August Harrington, Melissa Lum, Mahealani Kahala and Melissa Garabiles pose for a photo with items from the Kapolei Commons 12 concession before heading into the showcase Hale Ikua theater to screen a short film they produced.


Regal Cinemas aims to attract both film buffs and foodies to the new Kapolei Commons 12 multiplex when it officially opens to the general public next week.

Moviegoers will experience a new level of comfort sitting in one of 1,290 luxury recliners with electric controls and adjustable food and beverage trays to keep snacks and drinks within reach. Theaters will feature “giant, wall-to-wall” screens of varying sizes, according to Regal officials, and a satellite-based system will deliver films for playback using high-resolution digital projection equipment.

In the lobby, guests will find elements of Hawaiian culture throughout the room. A custom lighting element recreates the stars over Hawaii’s northern skies, with plantation-style teak shutters as window treatments and fishnet-inspired graphics in the carpets.

The lobby is also where you’ll find an extensive menu of gourmet burgers, specialty sandwiches, made-to-order pizza and fresh-baked desserts exclusive to the Kapolei complex. Sure, you can still try to smuggle in a package of kakimochi to go with an order of plain buttered popcorn and a soft drink, but Regal is confident the selection presented with the new menu will win Oahu residents over with locally-inspired flavors.

The Honolulu Star-Advertiser got an exclusive first look inside Kapolei Commons 12 earlier this week when Regal hosted a small group of students from the University of Hawaii West Oahu’s Academy for Creative Media. They wrote and directed a short film, “West is Best,” that will make its public debut on Thursday.

On Tuesday, they previewed the trailer with Academy for Creative Media founder and director Chris Lee. But before they could kick back in the multiplex’s centerpiece, the Hale Ikua theater (translated from Hawaiian as “house of the loud and thunderous voice,” according to a Regal spokesperson), samples from the menu were brought out for photos and tasting.

The Off-the-Hook Combo ($7.99) is a sweet-and-salty combination of blondie brownie bites, Maui potato chips and popcorn drizzled with caramel and chocolate sauce.

0414 regal popcorn

The Vietnamese-French Sandwich ($11.99 with Maui potato chips; add $1 for French fries) is Regal’s take on the traditional banh mi, with tender lemongrass chicken and pickled vegetables served on a fresh baguette and topped with cilantro.

0414 regal banhmi

The Paniolo Hot Dog ($7.59) is a mash-up of sweet and savory flavors built upon a fresh roll and Nathan’s Famous Angus beef hot dog. Start with bacon, sprinkle some chili flakes and drizzle sweet red chili sauce, then top with pineapple and cilantro. This one isn’t for the faint of heart!

0414 regal hot dog

Malasada Bites ($7.99) are house-made to order and dusted with cinnamon sugar.

0414 regal malasadas

Regal Cinemas partnered with local bakers Let Them Eat Cupcakes and The Hawaiian Pie Company to offer fresh cupcakes ($4.49) and Coco Mac Cookies ($6.99).

0414 regal kapolei desserts

Click here to see the complete Kapolei Commons 12 concession menu. Visit regmovies.com starting on Thursday for movie schedules and to reserve seats and purchase tickets online.

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Iolani Palace introduces 3D tour

By
April 7th, 2016



BRUCE ASATO / 2011Iolani Palace.

BRUCE ASATO / 2011

Iolani Palace.

While nothing will truly replace the chicken-skin feeling of standing inside Iolani Palace, visitors from around the world can now take a tour of the building without having to leave home.

The palace’s new 3D virtual tour allows those interested in the historic royal residence to get a closer look at artifacts and see rooms not typically open to the public via desktop computers and mobile devices.

“We are always striving to enhance the visitor experience,” said The Friends of Iolani Palace executive director Kippen de Alba Chu in a news release. “The virtual tour is not a replacement for experiencing the palace in person, (but) it gives guests an opportunity to ... take a glimpse into what they can expect on an upcoming trip.”

BRUCE ASATO / 2011The Music Room, also known as the Gold Room and the King's Private Drawing Room, is now accessible online via the palace's new 3D virtual tour.

BRUCE ASATO / 2011

The Music Room, also known as the Gold Room and the King's Private Drawing Room, is now accessible online via the palace's new 3D virtual tour.

Iolani Palace enlisted the services of LNG3D Hawaii, a local subsidiary of Canda-based LNG Studios, to create both a 3D tour and a “doll house model” of the structure using Matterport 3D scanning technology. Cameras were set up in more than 200 locations to map the palace interior.

The virtual tour was made possible by a $30,000 grant from the Robert Emens Black Fund at the Hawaii Community Foundation. Grant funds also paid for drone video footage of the palace from the air as well as interior architectural photos.

Iolani Palace, which was built in 1882 by King David Kalakaua and is the only royal residence in the United States, is open for real-life visits from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily (except Sunday). Visit www.iolanipalace.org for more information.
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Jason Genegabus has covered the local entertainment, nightlife, music and bar scenes since 2001. Contact him via email at jason@staradvertiser.com.

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LemonTea serves up artful blends

By
April 7th, 2016



web1_web06-D1-5-THINGS-5

I can’t remember the last time I’ve eaten a gummy bear. And now that I’ve tried the White Gummie Bear tea-lemonade from LemonTea Cafe, I think I’ll stick to drinking them.

Offered in 16-ounce ($4.55) and 20-ounce ($4.95) servings, I like mine with the cafe’s signature lemon tea made with black tea, honey and fresh lemon slices, but other options are available. LemonTea’s “lemonade mixologists,” as owner Alan Vuong describes them, are adept at creating the more than 20 flavors on the menu. Samples are provided before each drink is served to ensure satisfaction.

The first sip of a White Gummie Bear gives me Haribo candy flashbacks, but what I really like is how the drink changes as you work your way through it. Let it sit long enough for the ice to melt, and muddle the lemon to add dimension. It’ll make you wonder why you hadn’t started drinking black tea sooner.

LemonTea Cafe has locations at Pearlridge Center, inside Kakaako’s Salon Blanc and at Kamehameha Shopping Center. Keep up with the latest creations by following @lemonteahawaii on Instagram.

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