Archive for the ‘Music’ Category

Blue Note settles into Waikiki digs

By
May 11th, 2016



STAR-ADVERTISER / 2016New Orleans’ Rebirth Brass Band performed at the new Blue Note Hawaii in January.

STAR-ADVERTISER / 2016

New Orleans’ Rebirth Brass Band performed at the new Blue Note Hawaii in January.

Saturday marks five months since Blue Note Hawaii opened its doors at the Outrigger Waikiki on the Beach, and owner Steve Bensusan couldn’t be more pleased with the way things are going.

“In terms of the local audience, we’ve exceeded our expectations by far,” he said. “Local response to the venue has been amazing. We were surprised we didn’t have as many problems as we thought we would have.”

Bensusan’s father, Danny Bensusan, opened the original Blue Note Jazz Club in 1981 in New York City after immigrating to the United States from Israel. Blue Note Entertainment currently operates two jazz clubs in Japan and another in Italy along with New York and Hawaii locations. The family-owned company also owns and operates New York’s B.B. King Blues Club & Grill, the Highline Ballroom, Subrosa and Lucille’s Grill, as well as the Howard Theatre in Washington, D.C.

More than $3.5 million was spent renovating the former Society of Seven Showroom at the Outrigger Waikiki, turning the 9,000-square-foot space into a 300-seat performance venue that Bensusan said visiting artists can’t wait to come back to.

“Many of the artists who have performed here so far, they either haven’t been here before or haven’t performed here in a very long time,” he said. “The idea they can do this every year is very appealing. I’ll get calls from managers on the first night of their gigs asking to book for (2017).”

STAR-ADVERTISER / 2016The Rough Riders — Brother Noland, right, Willie K and John Cruz (not pictured) — performed at Blue Note Hawaii in April.

STAR-ADVERTISER / 2016

The Rough Riders — Brother Noland, right, Willie K and John Cruz (not pictured) — performed at Blue Note Hawaii in April.

The Wailers, Maxi Priest and Chaka Khan have all drawn strong support from local fans, as have an increasing number of Hawaii artists signed to play both one-time and recurring gigs at the venue. Bensusan said the goal is not to turn Blue Note Hawaii into a “standing rock club,” but to feature a variety of musical genres in a market hungry for new entertainment options.

“We’ve been trying to balance between some of the older heritage reggae acts and some of the younger ones we book maybe not at the Blue Note, but at some of our other clubs,” he said. “Most of our local acts here now are on Monday nights, but we’re doing some local weekend runs. It gives the artists the ability to play a proper room, and that’s something they’re not used to.

“The plan was always to announce the national acts and then add the local ones. It took us some time to research the local acts and figure out who we could get to play there. We’ve got a local talent buyer now and she’s doing a good job finding local acts for the room.”

Upcoming local artists scheduled to perform at Blue Note Hawaii include:

» May 23: Melveen Leed
» May 24, 25 and 28: Kalei Gamiao (opening for Andy McKee)
» May 26, 27 and 29: Taimane Gardner (opening for Andy McKee)
» May 30: Honolulu Jazz Quartet featuring John Kolivas
» June 6: Adagio
» June 21 and July 5: Willie K
» June 22: Paula Fuga
» June 29-30 and July 1: Jake Shimabukuro
» July 18: Kuana Torres Kahele

“You’re going to see more reggae, more R&B, maybe a little less heavy on the straight-ahead jazz, at least until we build the tourist market a little bit more,” Bensusan said. “I think it’s important to continue the diversity of the room. We’re even going a step further and getting into some classic rock.”

The easiest way to keep up with concert announcements is to keep checking Blue Note Hawaii’s website, he added. All seats are first-come-first-served, but management has quietly adjusted door times to minimize lines outside the club and give the kitchen staff an opportunity to serve customers more efficiently before showtime.

What we’ve been doing, especially for the bigger shows, is opening the doors even earlier,” Bensusan said. “That’s been working well to take the crunch off the bar and kitchen. We’ll open a half-hour earlier than published sometimes. It all depends on the lines.”

Posted in Music | Comments Off on Blue Note settles into Waikiki digs

Taking hip-hop to the classroom

By
April 29th, 2016



COURTESY TODAY'S FUTURE SOUNDDr. Raphael Travis talks about hip-hop and beat making with students at the University of Hawaii at Manoa on Thursday.

COURTESY TODAY'S FUTURE SOUND

Dr. Raphael Travis talks about hip-hop and beat making with students at the University of Hawaii at Manoa on Thursday.

Hip-hop music is so mainstream these days, most fans expect to hear or see elements of the culture intertwined with many forms of popular media. But did you know educators have started to incorporate the genre into their lesson plans and training materials?

University of Hawaii instructor and PhD candidate Kimberly Corbin is teaming up with Oakland-based hip-hop ambassador/producer Dr. Elliot Gann and Texas State University professor Dr. Raphael Travis to bring hip-hop to a pair of Honolulu high schools this week, followed by a beat battle fundraiser on Saturday at Kaka’ako Agora that’s open to the public.

“We always read so many negative things (in media), and as an educator I would really like the community to see that many of us are working hard to find ways to reach all children and to train our teacher candidates to do the same,” Corbin said via email. “The work we will do ... this week is important for the kids and for the faculty.”

Corbin, Gann and Travis took part in the 2016 Pacific Rim International Conference on Disability and Diversity at the Hawai’i Convention Center on Monday and Tuesday. On Wednesday, they visited three classes at Farrington High School; Kailua High School students got a visit yesterday morning, followed by a workshop in the afternoon at UH-Manoa.

According to Corbin, students can benefit from multimedia presentations that combine “theory, rationale and practical strategies to explore the use of hip-hop culture as an instructional tool to support student engagement and achievement.” Hip-hop culture helps foster positive growth in families and communities, she said.

Saturday’s Sound Wave Beat Battle Fundraiser aims to connect the classroom experience students received this week with a public event that promotes the same concepts and helps raise money to support future educational efforts. The all-ages event takes place from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at Kaka’ako Agora and is produced by Today’s Future Sound.

Admission to Sound Wave is $5 for those under 18 and $10 for those 18-and-over. If you’re 18+ and bring a can of food to donate, you’ll pay $7 at the door. Email info@todaysfuturesound.org or visit facebook.com/todaysfuturesound for more information.
———
Jason Genegabus has covered the local entertainment, nightlife, music and bar scenes since 2001. Contact him via email at jason@staradvertiser.com.

Posted in Music | Comments Off on Taking hip-hop to the classroom

Iron MC finalists feel the aloha

By
March 20th, 2016



PHOTOS COURTESY DAYLIN PELLETIERThe second annual Bacardi Iron MC competition wraps up Tuesday at The Republik.

PHOTOS COURTESY DAYLIN PELLETIER

The second annual Bacardi Iron MC competition wraps up Tuesday at The Republik.

There might be a little too much aloha in the building at this year’s Bacardi Iron MC finals for co-host Krystilez’s taste.

“We’ve had a different vibe this year,” said the local recording artist and radio personality. “There were a lot of positive MCs who weren’t into bringing people down.”

Krystilez, who will be joined by fellow Angry Locals member Big Mox in hosting Tuesday’s final round of competition, wasn’t pulling any punches.

“They’re soft,” he said. “We need to be training them for war! If you want uplifting, go to church. Iron sharpens iron here. Sometimes the crowd doesn’t always get what we’re trying to do.”

0317 iron mc 002

Four rappers — J-Shiu, Rukka, Koins and “wild card” winner Island Heir — made it to this week’s finals at The Republik after competing in three weeks of preliminary freestyle battles and other challenges that included sensory deprivation, hostile crowds and hip-hop trivia.

“It’s increased in quality this year,” Krystilez said of the competition, now in its second year. “The first one was kind of raw. This year, they’re more polished. They’re coming in with more of a sense of what they’re getting into.”

Except for the whole softness issue, of course.

Doors open at The Republik at 6 p.m. with no cover before 8:30 p.m. for those 21-and-over and $5 Bacardi specials all night. The finals start at 9 p.m. Tuesday; cover is $5 for 21+ and $10 for those 18-and-over. More info is available on Facebook.
———
Jason Genegabus has covered the local entertainment, nightlife, music and bar scenes since 2001. Contact him via email at jason@staradvertiser.com.

Posted in Bars & Clubs, Music | Comments Off on Iron MC finalists feel the aloha

Party in silence at ARTafterDARK

By
February 24th, 2016



ASSOCIATED PRESSParticipants in a silent disco wear headsets at a railway station in Paris during the 14th edition of "Nuit Blanche," or "Sleepless Night," last October.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Participants in a silent disco wear headsets at a railway station in Paris during the 14th edition of "Nuit Blanche," or "Sleepless Night," last October.


The Honolulu Museum of Art wraps up Black History Month on Friday with a party that promises to be equal parts funky and freaky.

ARTafterDARK’s theme this month is “Afrofuture,” a nod to the cultural aesthetic that has blossomed over the last 25 years and blends historical African elements with sci-fi and steampunk influences. The party will feature an art projection by Afrofuture artist Ed Hemphill; a screening of John Akomfrah’s Afrofuture film “The Last Angel of History” is also planned.

The freaky part? At some point in the evening you’ll find 500 people in a courtyard at the museum gyrating in silence.

No, I’m not predicting a mass mental breakdown — minds may melt during “Afrofuture,” but it will be thanks to music being pumped through wireless headphones to create what the museum is calling the first large-scale silent disco in Honolulu.

“Apparently there have been weddings and stuff,” explained Honolulu Museum of Art communications director Lesa Griffith. “We’re saying it’s the first large public one.”

ASSOCIATED PRESSA silent disco turned a Paris railway station into a giant nightclub last year.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A silent disco turned a Paris railway station into a giant nightclub last year.

Griffith said HMA deputy director Hathaway Jakobsen was among the staff who first floated the idea of hosting a silent disco about a year ago, but it was ARTafterDARK volunteer advisory board member Eddie Quan and special events associate Wainani Paikai who helped make it a reality. The museum is working with New York-based Sound Off Experience to bring the silent disco concept to Honolulu this week.

The first 500 people who show up on Friday will receive a wireless headset with access to not just one, but three different channels of music. DJs Maynard G, Davey Shindig, Sejika and count weevil will be represented by different colors while they spin, with headsets lighting up with the respective color as guests choose their favorite playlist.

“There’s a competition aspect for the DJs,” Griffith said. “They’ll be able to see who is the most popular.”

ARTafterDARK: “Afrofuture” goes from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday at the Honolulu Museum of Art, 900 S. Beretania St. Admission is $25 (includes one year HMA membership); free for HMA members. Call (808) 532-8700 or visit artafterdark.org.
———
Jason Genegabus has covered the local entertainment, nightlife, music and bar scenes since 2001. Contact him via email at jason@staradvertiser.com.

Posted in Art, Events, Music | Comments Off on Party in silence at ARTafterDARK

'Soul' searching for rare Hawaii tunes

By
December 16th, 2015



PHOTOS BY JASON GENEGABUS / JASON@STARADVERTISER.COM “Awesome Tapes From Africa” blogger Brian Shimkovitz made a guest appearance at Bevy earlier this month to share his cassette mixing skills.

PHOTOS BY JASON GENEGABUS / JASON@STARADVERTISER.COM

“Awesome Tapes From Africa” blogger Brian Shimkovitz made a guest appearance at Bevy earlier this month to share his cassette mixing skills.

Finding a Honolulu-based DJ who spins nothing but vinyl records is a rarity these days.

Just 10 years ago, it was common to find the island’s top talent continuing to haul crates upon crates of vinyl to gigs. CD-playing “turntables” called CDJs were growing in popularity, but some DJs found the technology didn’t afford them the same level of creativity as vinyl when manipulating music on the fly. Serato Scratch Live, which debuted in 2004 and was the professional standard among DJs until it was replaced by Serato DJ in 2013, had yet to achieve critical mass and create the mass exodus into to the digital realm we now live in.

So the news that Aloha Got Soul’s Roger Bong would play an all-cassette set alongside Los Angeles-based ethnomusicologist Brian Shimkovitz, who started the blog “Awesome Tapes From Africa” in 2006, made this reporter do a double-take.

SOUL TIME IN HAWAII

Presented by Aloha Got Soul

» Where: Bevy, 661 Auahi St.

» When: 9 p.m. Dec. 26

» Cost: Free

» Info: www.alohagotsoul.com

Mixing with cassettes? In 2015?

“Mediums like vinyl or cassette tape, there’s a lot of stuff you can’t find anywhere else,” Bong, 28, said during a break in the action at Bevy on Dec. 3. “Music has gone through phases. Records were the thing. That went out. Tapes came in and went out. Then CDs came in. Now it’s digital downloads.

“I think for what we’re doing, it’s just a process of rediscovery for us. It’s like a game for me. It’s a passion.”

Bong has built a name for himself digging through the music of generations past and sharing the best stuff he finds with like-minded fans once a month at Bevy in Kakaako. Along with the monthly Soul Time listening party in Honolulu that started in 2014 and followed two well-received mixtapes in 2012 and 2013, he now has partners who live in Chicago and London who host Soul Time events in each of those cities as well.

“We’re really not trying to do anything different. We’re just doing what we enjoy,” he said. “I think it’s because throughout the world there’s a lot of like-minded people doing the same thing. In Europe and Japan there’s a much bigger audience.

“If we were in any other city in the world right now and we were doing this with Awesome Tapes from Africa, we’d command a much bigger audience. The music scene here is pretty small compared to other places, so the level of interest for something like this is even smaller than what it might be somewhere else.”

Aloha Got Soul founder Roger Bong with some of the cassettes he brought to mix with at Bevy on Dec. 3.

Aloha Got Soul founder Roger Bong with some of the cassettes he brought to mix with at Bevy on Dec. 3.

Besides the monthly party at Bevy, Aloha Got Soul uses Soundcloud to get its sound out to the masses. Bong has also assumed the duties of a record label executive after re-releasing Nohelani Cypriano’s self-titled 1979 album on vinyl in August, which followed the release of a 7-inch vinyl single of 1960s and ‘70s local recording artist Mike Lundy’s “The Rhythm Of Life” and “Tropic Lightning.” (A follow-up pressing of the complete “The Rhythm of Life” LP released in September sold out as well.)

In February, Bong will partner with Strut Records to release an “Aloha Got Soul” compilation that features “rare Hawaiian grooves” by Lundy, Cypriano, Aura, Nova, Hal Bradbury and ‘Aina that were originally released between 1979 and 1985. It’s just the first of multiple releases planned for 2016.

“At the end of next year, I’m planning to release a compilation by a new-age artist who made electronic music here in the 1980s,” he said. “It’s in the same vein of what we’ve been doing so far.”

Bong added that while looking to the past to uncover forgotten music has worked well to establish the Aloha Got Soul brand, there’s only so much old music from Hawaii available to rediscover.

“Hawaii is a musically rich place,” he said. “What we try to do, I’d say we’re 65 to 70 percent of the way through. It can only grow so much.

“I’m trying to grow and evolve this naturally. It’s not always going to be us looking for old-school stuff. We’re going to need to bring the old and new together.”

Starting this month, Soul Time in Hawaii moves to the last Saturday of every month at Bevy. Bong will be joined by DJs Oliver Sequin and Hideki Yamamoto for another evening of soul, funk, disco, jazz, boogie and Hawaiian music. Visit www.alohagotsoul.com for more info and audio from previous parties.

———

Jason Genegabus has covered the local nightlife, music, bar and entertainment scenes since 2001. Contact him via email at jason@staradvertiser.com and follow him on Twitter and Google+.

Posted in Bars & Clubs, Latest News, Music, SA | Comments Off on 'Soul' searching for rare Hawaii tunes

Tyler, The Creator returns to Honolulu

By
December 7th, 2015



PHOTOS BY JAMES GARRETT / SPECIAL TO THE STAR-ADVERTISERTyler, The Creator, in the white T-shirt, performs with Taco and Jasper Dolphin at The Republik on Saturday.

PHOTOS BY JAMES GARRETT / SPECIAL TO THE STAR-ADVERTISER

Tyler, The Creator, in the white T-shirt, performs with Taco and Jasper Dolphin at The Republik on Saturday.

There’s a relatively fine line between acting too cool for everyone else in the room and coming off as an arrogant, self-absorbed windbag.

tyler the creator 03With Tyler, The Creator’s set at The Republik on Saturday, it was pretty obvious he didn’t care what anyone thought of him or his crew, regardless if they paid to be there or not. But at the same time, there was no mistaking that behind the raspy voice, vulgar language and a level of bluntness many of us wish we could maintain in our everyday lives, there exists an artist extremely proud of what he’s accomplished since his debut album, “Bastard,” hit the Internet in 2009.

The 24-year-old deserves plenty of praise for his role in the growth of hip-hop collective Odd Future Wolf Gang Kill Them All — which may or may not have disbanded earlier this year, depending on who you ask — and there’s no questioning his skills extend far beyond the rap realm with his experience as a producer, songwriter, clothing and concert merchandise designer, graphic artist and music video producer. He’s at a stage in his career where the adventures are his to choose and he’s got the money to finance just about anything.

And that’s why seeing him on stage a few months after releasing his latest album, “Cherry Bomb,” one might wonder why Tyler even bothers with touring right now.

Sure, watching him perform cuts off 2013’s “Wolf,” 2012’s “The OF Tape Vol. 2” and 2011’s “Goblin” was a fun history lesson for anyone unfamiliar with his discography... which had to have been all of maybe a dozen people at The Republik on Saturday. There was no shortage of karaoke action at this show, and Tyler himself even mentioned taking a break and letting the crowd take over his verses at one point.

But it was the back-and-forth between Tyler, hype men Taco and Jasper Dolphin and the audience between songs that was more telling than the performance itself.

From brashly admonishing the crowd to “take your photos now” at the start of the night — and making a point of ridiculing fans he caught with their phones out later on — to openly admitting wanting to “get the f—k off this stage” before closing things out with “Tamale,” it was pretty obvious we were all getting the unfiltered Tyler, for better or worse. Reflecting on the show afterward, it was hard to decide which was more uncomfortable, the extended moments of complete silence between songs or hearing someone on stage actually ask over a microphone what time it was just 20 minutes into the set.

tyler the creator 01

Among the more inspiring lines from Tyler on Saturday:

“I appreciate your soul.”

“Last time we was in Hawaii, there was a tsunami warning. That s—t was crazy. Okay, I have nothing else to say.”

“Whose weed is this? How did it get on stage?” (As he proceeded to light and smoke whatever it was that he found.)

“Are my hands soft?”

While not quite achieving the level of chaos associated with a full-fledged Odd Future performance, fans of the group’s founder surely didn’t leave disappointed after 60 minutes of putting their hands up, jumping around like crazy and getting bottle after bottle of water sprayed on them.

Did Tyler care? Probably not. After dancing a quick jig and peeling off his T-shirt to toss into the crowd, he was long gone, leaving fans hoping for an encore with the proverbial lump of coal in their stockings on this December evening in Honolulu.

———

Jason Genegabus has covered the local nightlife, music, bar and entertainment scenes since 2001. Contact him via email at jason@staradvertiser.com and follow him on Twitter and Google+.

Posted in Latest News, Music, Reviews, SA | Comments Off on Tyler, The Creator returns to Honolulu

McKnight returns for Valentine's Day

By
November 30th, 2015



STAR-ADVERTISER / 2011Brian McKnight performs at the Blaisdell Concert Hall in 2011.

STAR-ADVERTISER / 2011

Brian McKnight performs at the Blaisdell Concert Hall in 2011.

Tickets went on sale today for a pre-Valentine’s Day concert featuring Brian McKnight and En Vogue at Blaisdell Arena.

McKnight, a Grammy Award-nominated R&B singer, songwriter and producer who has sold more than 25 million albums worldwide, has performed on Valentine’s Day here before — he actually proposed to then-girlfriend Annalisa Mungcal during a 2010 Blaisdell concert. His most recent visit came a year later when he performed at the Blaisdell Concert Hall.

COURTESY TANTRIQ ENTERTAINMENTEn Vogue.

COURTESY TANTRIQ ENTERTAINMENT

En Vogue.

En Vogue returns to Honolulu after frequent visits in recent years. Formed in 1989, original members Cindy Herron-Braggs and Terry Ellis now perform with Rhonda Bennett; expect hits like “Hold On,” “My Lovin’ (You’re Never Gonna Get It)” and “Free Your Mind.”

Promoter Tantriq Entertainment has tickets priced from $49 to $139 available at the Blaisdell box office, all Walmart stores and online at www.ticketmaster.com.

———

Jason Genegabus is Entertainment Editor/Online at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser and has covered the local nightlife, music, bar and entertainment scenes since 2001. Contact him via email at jason@staradvertiser.com and follow him on Twitter and Google+.

Posted in Latest News, Music | Comments Off on McKnight returns for Valentine's Day

UB40 founders make Hawaii visit

By
October 21st, 2015



When a popular band loses its lead singer, there’s often quite a bit of drama among fans when a new voice steps in to take the reigns.

COURTESY UB40Former UB40 members, from left, Mickey Virtue, Ali Campbell and Astro Wilson will headline the Honolulu stop of the UB40 The Reunited Tour in January.

COURTESY UB40

Former UB40 members, from left, Mickey Virtue, Ali Campbell and Astro Wilson will headline the Honolulu stop of the UB40 The Reunited Tour in January.

Just look at Van Halen. Or Journey.

But it seems UB40 got things backward. Five years after leaving the group to pursue a solo career, Ali Campbell and fellow founding members Astro Wilson and Mickey Virtue decided to get the get the band back together.

Only problem? UB40 never went away when Campbell left in 2008. They simply replaced him with his brother, Duncan Campbell, and continued to release music and tour the world.

Once UB40 Reunited — the new name used by Ali Campbell, Astro and Virtue — started playing shows last year, the biggest drama came from the brothers Campbell as they traded shots in press interviews.

Airing out all their dirty laundry inevitably led to a lawsuit in the UK that appears to be heading to trial early next year. At stake are the rights to use the UB40 name, which the three former members are now using without the “Reunited” tag. When they return to Honolulu early next year, they’ll be introduced as UB40 Featuring Ali Campbell, Astro and Mickey Virtue. Expect hits like “Red, Red Wine,” “(I Can’t Help) Falling in Love” and “Kingston Town” along with newer tracks off the trio's 2014 album, "Silhouette."

Tickets for the Jan. 29 concert at Blaisdell Arena are priced from $39 to $139 and go on sale at 9 a.m. Saturday at the Blaisdell Box Office, all Ticketmaster outlets (including all Walmart stores on Oahu) and online at www.ticketmaster.com. The Hawaii stop of the UB40 The Reunited Tour is produced by promoters Ray Jr. and Tantriq Entertainment.

———

Jason Genegabus is Entertainment Editor/Online at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser and has covered the local nightlife, music, bar and entertainment scenes since 2001. Contact him via email at jason@staradvertiser.com and follow him on Twitter and Google+.

Posted in Latest News, Music, SA | Comments Off on UB40 founders make Hawaii visit

The Green, Katchafire play Pepsi shows

By
August 12th, 2015



Pepsi will combine two separate marketing campaigns later this month when the soft drink manufacturer hosts a pair of concerts at Wet ’n’ Wild Hawaii and Sea Life Park.

The Green and Katchafire will headline the Drink Aloha Concert Series, playing off a Hawaii-based promotional effort currently used in commercials and point-of-sale displays at local retailers. Throughout the rest of the United States, Pepsi calls its music campaign Out of the Blue, describing the shows as “an outlet for popular artists to perform at non-traditional venues for one-of-a-kind music experiences.”

STAR-ADVERTISERThe Green will headline a concert at Wet 'n' Wild on Aug. 29.

STAR-ADVERTISER

The Green will headline a concert at Wet 'n' Wild on Aug. 29.

The Drink Aloha Concert Series will kick off with The Green and Natural Vibrations at Wet ’n’ Wild on Aug. 29, followed by Katchafire and Ooklah the Moc at Sea Life Park on Sept. 5. Doors open at 5 p.m. for both concerts, with music starting at 6 p.m. and the headliner on stage around 8:30 p.m.

In addition to the music, Wet ’n’ Wild will offer exclusive access to water rides from 5 to 9 p.m. Aug. 29, including the new Waimea Whirl. At Sea Life Park, those with tickets to the concert can get into the park for free after 2 p.m. Sept. 5 to enjoy the park’s various attractions, including the popular dolphin show.

Tickets for the Drink Aloha Concert Series are $25 and available at all Local Motion stores on Oahu, the Wet ’n’ Wild and Sea Life Park ticket offices and online at www.flavorus.com/drinkalohaconcert. Foodland also offers a two-for-one ticket deal to customers who buy five participating Pepsi products, with a promo code given at the register.

Pepsi will also give out free tickets around Honolulu via its Drink Aloha vehicle and online using the hashtags #DrinkAloha and #DrinkAlohaFriday on Instagram.

———

Jason Genegabus is Entertainment Editor/Online at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser and has covered the local nightlife, music, bar and entertainment scenes since 2001. Contact him via email at jason@staradvertiser.com and follow him on Twitter and Google+.

Posted in Latest News, Music | Comments Off on The Green, Katchafire play Pepsi shows

Johnson lends support to Hokule‘a

By
March 11th, 2015



COURTESY THE POLYNESIAN VOYAGING SOCIETYJack Johnson, middle, performs with Paula Fuga, left, and Chucky Boy Chock. The trio has released a digital single in support of the Polynesian Voyaging Society's current worldwide voyage.

COURTESY THE POLYNESIAN VOYAGING SOCIETY

Jack Johnson, middle, performs with Paula Fuga, left, and Chucky Boy Chock. The trio has released a digital single in support of the Polynesian Voyaging Society's current worldwide voyage.

Jack Johnson is using his celebrity status to help raise funds for a worthy cause yet again.

With assistance from fellow Hawaii-based musicians Paula Fuga and Chucky Boy Chock, Johnson has embarked on a mission to raise $75,000 in support of the Polynesian Voyaging Society.

Those who donate $2 via crowdfunding website RallySong.com will be able to download “Na Ho‘okele Opiopio,” a digital-only single written by Chock and recorded in honor of the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage.

“The Polynesian discovery of islands throughout the Pacific Ocean was one of humanity’s most amazing achievements,” Johnson said in a press release. “With the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage, we have a new generation of navigators exploring the earth and bringing people together to find a sustainable future. We are proud to support them with this song.”

Translated into English as “The Young Navigators,” the single is just one of a few perks available to contributors. Anyone who donates will be eligible to win an ukulele signed by Johnson and a mahogany alaia surf board made of reclaimed wood from the support brace for the deckboards of the original Hokule‘a.

As of early Wednesday morning, 25 of 50 autographed Jack Johnson CDs were still available for a $30 contribution, while 28 of 50 signed copies of Johnson’s “En Concert” vinyl release were available for $50.

Other perks remaining include a limited edition, Hokule‘a-inspired T-shirt and membership in the Polynesian Voyaging Society ($75 for women’s shirts, $76 for men’s), a Hello Makana Basket of Aloha ($150), limited edition photographic prints ($250) and a limited edition poster from the historic 1976 Hokule‘a voyage that started it all.

And while a $15,000 Papa He’e Nalu medium alaia surfboard was already snatched up, one lucky contributor will be able to scoop up a large alaia surfboard for a $25,000 donation.

“Across the globe, there are young people with the courage to set a new course and protect our natural environment,” Polynesian Voyaging Society president Nainoa Thompson said in the release. “They are our leaders and navigators, whether they are on canoes or not, and we hope this campaign will provide a way for more people to join our voyage.”

The online campaign will run until April 25. All proceeds raised will benefit the PVS, which plans to travel from New Zealand to Australia and South Africa during 2015.

It has been 40 years since Hokule‘a embarked on its maiden voyage from Kaneohe Bay. The Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage will see the traditional Hawaiian canoe and its sister canoe, Hikianalia, cover 47,000 nautical miles and call upon 85 ports in 26 nations before completing its journey in 2017.

———

Jason Genegabus is Entertainment Editor/Online at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser and has covered the local nightlife, music, bar and entertainment scenes since 2001. Contact him via email at jason@staradvertiser.com and follow him on Twitter and Google+.

RELATED VIDEO:

Posted in Latest News, Music | Comments Off on Johnson lends support to Hokule‘a

Recent Posts

Recent Comments

Archives

Categories